Thursday, April 4, 2019

Animation Writer Q&A: Commercials?




Q: (With regard to a writing sample) I noticed that the Fairly Odd Parents cartoon is 11 mins per episode. How many commercials are there during those 11 min episodes? 

A: It's more instructive to look at it as a full half hour with 2 - eleven minute episodes. The rest of the time is split between commercials and credits. When writing an eleven minute sample episode, you don't need to worry about the commercials, just write the episode (18-20 pages, screenplay format).

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Wednesday, April 3, 2019

Mini Review: PANDORA GETS JEALOUS by Carolyn Hennesy



Pandora brings a box (THE box) to school for her project and when it accidentally gets opened, has to round up all of the bad stuff that escaped within a year . . . or else! Filled with tons of heart and humor, Pandora Gets Jealous is a fun, well-written story where the beguiling main characters face genuine peril. Author Hennesy knows what she's doing and keeps things moving along at just the right pace. Looking forward to reading the rest of the series. Recommended.

Purchase Pandora Gets Jealous HERE!

Saturday, March 30, 2019

Mini Review: PALM TREES AND SNOW FLAKES by Scott Bury



A fun and fast-paced read, "Palm Trees and Snowflakes" is a welcome continuation of the "Hawaiian Storm" mystery series. This time, FBI Special Agent Vanessa Storm does battle with a shady operation that's trying to saturate Honolulu (and beyond) with a lethal designer drug called "Snowflake." Author Bury spins a good yarn, deftly combining a strong mystery with romance and elements of a police procedural. Recommended.

Wednesday, March 20, 2019

Mini Review: BRING ON THE MAGIC by Brian Clopper



A young wizard, Randall Flood, and a talking spell book, Chuck, team up to protect the mythical creatures and raw magic that have begun to seep back into our modern world. All seems to be going well until Randall develops a nagging suspicion that his noble mission may not be all that noble.  With its sharp writing, light-hearted humor, exciting action, and impressive world-building, "Bring On the Magic" has quickly become my favorite Brian Clopper book. Recommended.

Friday, March 1, 2019

Hellboy (2019 Movie) New Trailer “Red Band”

Ok, yeah. Didn't think I would, but I'm liking the look and feel of this. (Caution: Contains potty mouth characters)


Friday, February 8, 2019

Wednesday, January 2, 2019

Animation Writer Q&A: Should I Try to Trick Disney?



Q: I'm  trying  to  send  my  animation  proposal  to  Disney.  Since  I  don't  have  an  agent,  I  was  thinking  about  having  my  friend's  name  on  the  outside  of  the  package  as  my  manager  just  to  get  my  material  in  the  door.  If  Disney  is  interested,  then  I'll  get  an  agent  to  take  it  from  there.  Does this sound like a reasonable idea?

A: No, it doesn't. The people at the studios who take pitches know all of the animation agencies, so they'll spot this one right away. The only real way to get your idea in front of decision makers at a studio or production company is to submit your material through an agent who specializes in writing for animation.

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Thoughts about the above question? Got a question about animation writing in general? Leave it in the comments.

Saturday, December 1, 2018

GHOST STAR Discount December!


GHOST STAR Kindle Edition is ON SALE (12/1/18 - 12/31/18) for $0.99! 
 #YA #scifi #spaceopera #spacemarines #military #kindlepress Please share! 😊
 
CLICK HERE to order.
 
 When his father and crewmates are attacked and killed by a ruthless alien commander, young Galen Bray becomes the new captain of the GHOST STAR, a notorious smuggling vessel. Barely escaping capture, Galen sets out to rescue the only other survivor of the vicious attack, his sister Trem. Along the way, he discovers a mysterious people thought wiped out long ago, his family's surprising origins, and a destiny he never imagined . . .
 
 

Sunday, November 18, 2018

Animation Writer FAQ: Mining for Advertisers?

Q: I am in the process of preparing a pitch bible for 52 X 11 (Roger note: 52x11 = fifty-two, eleven minute episodes) animated series and I wanted to know if there is a format or process to prospect advertisers to get them on board. I would definitely be beating the odds if I have an advertiser already. 

A: I've never done it that way nor have I heard of anyone else successfully recruiting advertisers in order to sell an animated project. That's just not how it's done in the U.S. (as far as I know). The usual method for getting a show on the air is to do a pitch bible (character designs, descriptions, etc.) and then set up pitch meetings at the various networks such as Nick or Cartoon Network (which is infinitely easier if you have an agent). So, to answer your question directly: No. I am unaware of any format or process that is used to "prospect" advertisers.
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 Prospector art by Tony Oliver from Denver, CO, USA (by way of Wikimedia Commons)

Thursday, November 15, 2018

TREEHOUSE DETECTIVES: Season Two is Here!


TREEHOUSE DETECTIVES is back on NETFLIX for Season Two with a bunch of fun new episodes, many written by me! 
 
CLICK HERE to see the Season Two trailer!


Saturday, October 27, 2018

Animation Writer FAQ: How to Get an Animation Agent

Q: I've written a feature animation script. I've contacted some animation studios first but they considered it an unsolicited submission. I've also contacted literary agencies, but most agencies represent only action, fiction, sci-fi, horror, and not animation. It seems that it’s very difficult to submit my animated script to the studios, especially that these kind of scripts are generated in-house. May ask you to mention to me, to your knowledge, some agencies that still accept submission queries from animation writers? Or a production company that deals with animation studios?
A: Finding an agent is the best way to go. Many literary agencies have at least one agent who handles animation. Try contacting as many as you can and asking if they have such a person on staff and go from there. If they don't have one, ask if they wouldn't mind pointing you in the direction of an agency that does.  They'll likely say no, but you never know. You can also try contacting TAG (The Animation Guild) and the Writer's Guild of America's "Animation Caucus" and asking them your perfectly reasonable question. 
Two agencies I can think of that are exclusive to animation are Gotham and Natural Talent. I'm sure there are more. You can Google their contact information.
Good luck to you! 
 
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